Update: BGR Responds to Cyclone Idai

Disaster Response | Print

The March 14 cyclone, Cyclone Idai, has left a confirmed 447 people dead and nearly 110,000 people displaced in shelters throughout the region. The cyclone directly struck Beira, Mozambique, a city of 500,000 people. In the following days, massive rains and subsequent flooding has been responsible for deaths in Mozambique, Malawi, and Zimbabwe.

Despite the vast number of people impacted, flooded transportation routes, and difficulty transporting supplies, BGR assistance teams are currently assisting in the areas of water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) and shelter needs.

BGR is working with local partners to respond by:

  • Purchasing tarps to provide temporary shelter.
  • Identifying water systems that need immediate repair.
  • Ensuring functioning WASH stations for schools and health facilities, as well as sanitation and waste management in affected areas.
  • Distributing water purification supplies and ensuring adequate supplies of clean water, particularly in areas at high risk for cholera.
  • Preparing to distribute food and household items such as cookware and hygiene kits.

We continue to ask for your prayers for people in need and those responding to this rapidly changing disaster. Fluctuating water levels, damaged infrastructure, and the sheer number of people affected create barriers to getting people help. BGR will continue to monitor the situation and provide assistance as needed.

If you’d like to help people affected by Cyclone Idai, please donate to BGR’s disaster response fund below. Thank you for joining us in support of our brothers and sisters in Africa.

*As a Sphere-trained organization and associate member of Sphere, BGR understands the internationally accepted minimum standards in the area of WASH and is committed to meeting those standards.

Photo credit: “Mozambique: Full Extent of Humanitarian Emergency Still Emerging.” International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

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