Father suffers to keep his son warm

Refugees and IDPs | Print

(For the privacy and dignity of the individual, this photo does not show the person mentioned in the story.)

A parent will sacrifice just about anything for a child—even after the child is grown. Not long ago, Giannis shivered for his son.

An economic crisis has swept Giannis’s country, throwing much of the population into desperate poverty. More than 1.5 million are unemployed. Average income has dropped 60 percent as taxes have risen, and now, people all over the nation are hungry.

Giannis is one of them. He once owned a radio station but has now retired and depends on a pension from the government. Yet, the crisis has delayed that pension, and he now faces steep taxes. What money he does receive goes to help pay bills for the radio station, which his daughter now owns. His family is suffering like everyone else, and he struggles to satisfy their gnawing hunger.

Not long ago, your dollars helped provide a box of food for his family, but Giannis couldn’t enjoy it while so many around him grew thinner by the day. He shared two-thirds of the food your generosity had given his family with others whose cupboards were also bare. And then, he helped those families get on BGR’s food distribution lists.

And for their son, Giannis and his wife sacrificed the most.

BGR had given the man heating oil to warm his home, but Giannis kept thinking about his son’s young family of five, who would have to huddle together for heat. So, he and his wife gave up their portion of oil, choosing to suffer throughout the winter so their son could stay warm.

Thank you for giving this man the means to provide not only for his son’s family but for other people, as well. You helped Giannis take care of his own—and he felt dignity in every sacrifice.

Today, honor Giannis’s sacrifice by considering one of your own. In the Christmas Gift Catalog, $50 keeps a family in need fed for a month. $10 wraps someone in a cozy blanket for the winter.

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